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C++

A Brief History of C++

A Brief History of C++

Nowadays computers are able to perform many different tasks, from simple mathematical operations to sophisticated animated simulations. But the computer does not create these tasks by itself; these are performed following a series of predefined instructions called computer languages. A computer language is a set of instructions and a series …

perl_icon2

sprintf Format List

Returns a string formatted by the usual printf conventions of the C library function sprintf. See below for more details and see sprintf(3) or printf(3) on your system for an explanation of the general principles. For example: # Format number with up to 8 leading zeroes $result = sprintf(“%08d”, $number); …

micro-service-architecture

Microservices: Decomposing Applications for Deployability and Scalability

This article describes the increasingly popular Microservice architecture pattern. The big idea behind microservices is to architect large, complex and long-lived applications as a set of cohesive services that evolve over time. The term microservices strongly suggests that the services should be small. Some in the community even advocate building …

BFSGraph

Breadth First Search in C++

Breadth First Search in C++ – Algorithm and Source Code Basic Theory Breadth – first searches are performed by exploring all nodes at a given depth before proceeding to the next level. This means that all immediate children of nodes are explored before any of the children’s children are considered. …

php

Building PHP extensions with C++ the easy way

Here is an easy way to build a PHP extension with C++ and default PHP packages on a Ubuntu system. I use SWIG to wrap C++ code to the Zend API. When using loops and recursion intensively, porting a few functions to C++ can give you some extra power. First, …

Depth First Search in C++ – Algorithm and Source Code

Basic Theory Depth – first searches are performed by diving downward into a tree as quickly as possible. It does this by always generating a child node from the most recently expanded node, then generating that child’s children, and so on until a goal is found or some cutoff depth …